borninsudan
borninsudan:

mishapenmagic:

letmebeyourtlc:

zandalarian:

niknak79:

Baby going through tunnel

probably thought his entire existence ended

nerdy moment: babies at that age don’t have object permanence. if the object cannot be seen, it does not exist. image how freaked the fuck out you would be if suddenly everything went black - effectively ceasing to exist. the baby’s entire world vanished then came back.
so yeah. he probably did think his entire existence ended.

It’s not nerdy. It’s called child development.


Oh man I’m laughing so hard

borninsudan:

mishapenmagic:

letmebeyourtlc:

zandalarian:

niknak79:

Baby going through tunnel

probably thought his entire existence ended

nerdy moment: babies at that age don’t have object permanence. if the object cannot be seen, it does not exist. image how freaked the fuck out you would be if suddenly everything went black - effectively ceasing to exist. the baby’s entire world vanished then came back.

so yeah. he probably did think his entire existence ended.

It’s not nerdy. It’s called child development.

Oh man I’m laughing so hard

nigga-are-you-even-kawaii

bitchcraftandwiggatry:

It’s officially gone too far now.

ourafrica
yearningforunity:

Saya: Dance and Survival in an Afro-Bolivian Village

In the heartland of Bolivia, slavery and liberation are matters of living memory. African descendants worked as slaves until 1952, when slavery was abolished. Despite their being in the area for over 500 years, the national census doesn’t acknowledge their existence. They struggle for cultural survival maintaining their identity when they perform the “Saya” a dance rooted in their African heritage.

yearningforunity:

Saya: Dance and Survival in an Afro-Bolivian Village

In the heartland of Bolivia, slavery and liberation are matters of living memory. African descendants worked as slaves until 1952, when slavery was abolished. Despite their being in the area for over 500 years, the national census doesn’t acknowledge their existence. They struggle for cultural survival maintaining their identity when they perform the “Saya” a dance rooted in their African heritage.